Hiromi Katayama

My work addresses a perspective on nature that is found within my own culture.  I believe personal history is influenced by one's culture, which originates through nature.  My work demonstrates how the two are deeply connected, as I have been investigating how I personally relate to my own culture through nature.
I will never forget the moment when I found a single small cherry blossom tree outside my studio during my first year of study in the United States. I have never missed my country as much as I did in that moment, as it triggered an intense memory of home which invoked some very strong emotions. From that experience, I have learned that a cherry blossom tree could serve as a symbol of where I come from, as well as enable me to share a very special and personal experience, as the cherry blossom is a very iconic symbol of Japanese culture.

My paintings are created in the Japanese traditional painting technique, Nihonga. I import most of my painting materials, such as Japanese traditional pigments and animal-based collagen glue from Japan. Most of my work is painted on wooden panels and canvas. In Nihonga, we do not mix color, instead we layer colors on top of each other to create deep unique colors. It is always my dream to share this cultural form of Japanese art, Nihonga, with an audience through my works.

Since the natural disaster in my home country of Japan, I have begun to yearn for the resiliency so often seen in nature. My paintings represent my wish to exist with nature and culture in a harmonious relationship not only in my life, but also in the person I am and will become.

My paintings are created in the Japanese traditional painting technique, Nihonga. I import most of my painting materials, such as Japanese traditional pigments and animal-based collagen glue from Japan. Most of my work is painted on wooden panels and canvas. In Nihonga, we do not mix color, instead we layer colors on top of each other to create deep unique colors. It is always my dream to share this cultural form of Japanese art, Nihonga, with an audience through my works.

Since the natural disaster in my home country of Japan, I have begun to yearn for the resiliency so often seen in nature. My paintings represent my wish to exist with nature and culture in a harmonious relationship not only in my life, but also in the person I am and will become.


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